Tuesday, 8 July 2008

Yatch


One of only two remaining Royal Yachts in Europe, HNoMY Norge (in Norwegian, KS Norge, or K/S Norge) is the Royal Yacht of the King of Norway. The ship's name Norge is Norwegian for Norway.
The Royal Yacht Norge was the Norwegian people's gift to King Haakon VII in 1947. The yacht is owned by the King but maintained and manned by the Royal Norwegian Navy.
A ship prefix is a combination of letters, usually abbreviations, used in front of the name of a civilian or naval ship.
Prefixes for civilian vessels may either identify the type of propulsion, such as "SS" for
steamship, or purpose, such as "RV" for research vessel. Civilian prefixes are often used inconsistently, and frequently not at all. Sometimes a slash is used to separate the letters, as in "M/S".
Naval prefixes came into use as abbreviations for longer titles, such as "His/Her Majesty's Ship" in the
Royal Navy, abbreviated "H.M.S." and then "HMS". Earlier uses often included the type of vessel, as for instance "U.S.F." ("United States Frigate") for frigates of the United States Navy. Today the common practice is to use a single prefix for all warships of a nation's navy, and other prefixes for auxiliaries and ships of allied services, such as coast guards.

Some generic prefixes:

S/Y Sail Yacht

M/Y Motor Yacht

M/B Motor Boat

M/T Motor Tanker

S/S Steam Ship (eller D/S på norsk Damp Skip)

T/T Turbin Tanker

R/S Rescue Ship

M/F Motor Ferry

S/V Sailng Vessel


Aker Brygge




Nesøya Bridge and two old Colin Archer boats.




Colin Archer (22 July 1832 - 3 February 1921) was a naval architect and shipbuilder from Larvik, Norway. He was born of Scottish parents who emigrated to Norway in 1825.
Prior to his career as a naval architect in Norway, he spent time in
Queensland, Australia, with his brother, Thomas. While there, he sailed with a cargo up the Fitzroy River, Queensland "when it was almost if not quite unknown".
He and his
shipyard were known for building durable and safe ships. The most notable single ship built by Colin Archer was the Fram, which participated in expeditions to the North Pole, and later Roald Amundsen's historic first expedition to the South Pole. He also designed a sturdy sailing vessel class for the Redningsselskapet (The Norwegian Lifeboat institution) which was used for many years and now is referred to as a Colin Archer. Fram is now preserved in the Fram Museum on Bygdøy, Oslo, Norway. The prototype lifeboat "Colin Archer RS 1" is still afloat and in use as a floating museum.
Archer spent a lot of time calculating how an efficient hull should be designed. Even to this day, people still consult his work when designing new ships. He is credited with over 200 vessels.
Two rescue ships were named after him; the
Colin Archer of 1893 and a later Colin Archer.
Archer's designs were adapted to pleasure sailing in the 20th century. In 1928 William Atkin scaled down Archer's 47-foot Regis Voyager, a pilot boat, to make the 32-foot Eric. This design went on to become very influential in ocean sailing, with boats such as
Vito Dumas's Lehg II and Robin Knox-Johnston's Suhaili making notable circumnavigations. In the 1970s, the design was adapted to glass-reinforced plastic by William Crealock, and became the Westsail 32; this famous cruising boat has, in turn, inspired many imitations, so that the "Archer double-ender" style of boat continues to be popular to this day.
The Colin Archer Memorial Race sailing race is named in his honour. The race starts in
Lauwersoog (The Netherlands) and finishing near Larvik in Norway, organised every two years. The distance is about 365 nautical mile and -depending on the weather and the type of ship- the sailing time generally amounts to 3 to 5 days.















Christian Radich is a Norwegian full rigged ship, named after a Norwegian shipowner. The vessel was built at Framnæs shipyard in Sandefjord, Norway, and was delivered on 17 June 1937. The owner was The Christian Radich Sail Training Foundation established by a grant from a cavalry and officer of that name.

The vessel is a full rigged three masted steel hull, callsign is LJLM, its homeport is Oslo, and the IMO number is 5071729. The class society is Det Norske Veritas, DNV, and its built to +1A1, E0.


The vessel is 62.5 m long, with an overall length of 73 m including the bowsprit and a maximum width of 9.7 m. She has a draught of about 4.7 meters and a displacement at full load of 1050 tons. Under engine power, the Christian Radich reaches a top speed of 10 knots, while she can make up to 14 knots under sail.


34 comments:

CaBaCuRl said...

Beautiful pictures of glorious yachts! For me, there is hardly a better scene than Sydney Harbour full of Tall Ships under full sail. Thank you for all that interesting information too.

Judy said...

What beautiful pictures. I can't believe how big the one in the top picture is. Good post.

Your EG Tour Guide said...

With such a long coastline, do most Norwegians own yachts or smaller boats. What wonderful photos to look at on a hot summer day. Now to just imagine a cool breeze!

CrazyCath said...

That first one is some yacht!! And the last one of the rigged ship... wow!
Great shots too of the other yachts - are you sure there are enough? ;0)
Lovely post again John. Mine's up.

Andrea said...

That first one is what I call a yacht. Very nice photos.

ellen b said...

What fabulous wonderful Yachts and boats and water. The photos are beautiful!

kRiZ cPEc said...

Royal yachts, no wonder so huge. Thanks for sharing.

my imaginary said...

omg...it is beautiful yachts

Mine in here Thanks

Picturing of Life said...

great photos of ur yachts

Visit me in here Thanks

photowannabe said...

Now that's some Royal Yacht. All of your shots are so pretty. I do like the tall ships too.

evlahos said...

great great post coming up with amazing shots and info

I wish you a great summer

ArneA said...

Tenker ikke så ofte på Yacht når jeg ser Kongeskibet og Christian Radich men bildene er så vakre at de "godtas" med tiltredelse.
På vei nordover bør dere også få med dere Nordangsdalen;
dvs. Veien fra Lom til Grotli og til Geiranger via Dalsnibba. Ferjen til Hellesylt og veien ned Nordangsdalen til Union Øye og Hjørundfjorden. Om mulig over Standal før Ålesund og Molde vil ta dere til Atlanterhavsveien og Kristiansund.
Da er dere så slitne av Natur at dere tar Hurtigruten langs kysten til Lofoten.(der har jeg ennå ikke vært)
God ferie uansett veivalg

Aileni said...

What a splendid selection and commentary, John.

Anne-Berit said...

Flotte bilder fra deg som vanlig John.Det ligger en Award og venter på deg på bloggen min.Ha en fortsatt fin sommer!

Dina said...

Wow, I learned a lot and enjoyed a lot here. Boats and especially tall ships are one of my favorite things "on earth."

Reader Wil said...

Thanks for showing us all those beautiful ships! As a sailor's daughter I can appreciate that very much. In Amsterdam we have occasionaly an "invasion" of tall ships, which are so grand to see.

Müge Tekil said...

Thank you dear John for these beautiful pictures and precious informations! It was a very good post.

AphotoAday said...

Oh yeah -- "y"acht...
Very impressive -- and I suppose I'd end up in the brig if I called them a boat...

And that's a pretty good reward for being the King -- "a yacht, how nice, thank you very much"...

Blue said...

Serious yachts, wonderful photo's.
My fav. the very last one - Oh to sail away in her...

RuneE said...

Jeg skjønner at du er en skikkelig båtentusiast - her var det mye fin informasjon og gode bilder. Mye godt arbeid på alle måter. Skulle gjerne hatt den første...

Tar tid med å svare alle denne gang: 3G med Telenors mobile bredbånd på hytten er nok raskere enn gamle dagers ISDN eller modem, men det er definitivt ikke ADSL eller fiber!

imac said...

Great photos here John. Really great post.

pop and see my Y.

Denise said...

Phew! Much bigger than mine! LOL!

fishing guy said...

John: Wow, what a lot of yacht photos. Each one was very special.

esnorway said...

ja fine bilder som alti

kjpweb said...

Wonderful, John! Each of these images hold their own! Bravo!
Cheers, Klaus

Dragonstar said...

Great post John, thank you. I hadn't heard of Colin Archer, so I've learned a lot.

starnitesky said...

Beautiful photographs and very interesting, thanks for all the information.

becky voyles said...

There is just something about the last yacht photo that really called out to me so that one would have to be my preference.

Paulie said...

Very enjoyable post for Y! Only saw one other yacht so far. . .

I will also post on your odd shots and bridges between down below. . . am kinda slow at commenting this week because of problems with my allergies.

Anonymous said...

Hi! I would like to contact you but I didn't find any email, webpage or phonenumber to you. Would love to use one of your pictures for a public use. Can you mail me at christian.gronroos@byggmax.se

Katney said...

I was impressed--greatly impressed--by the Norge. Then I started scrolling to find the comment link. Wow! I hadn't thought greatly that Norway is such a seafaring country. There were the Vikings, of course, but it is so obvious that Norway would have so many awesome yachts.

Kim said...

I have seen a lot of Yachts for Y, but that first one has got to be the biggest. Great photos.

JC said...

I love tall ships! These are spectacular!

Louis la Vache said...

"Louis" enjoyed your yacht tour, John!